Learners to be Let Loose on Motorways from 2018

by Adam Phillips - 1 Min Read

After a lengthy consultation period, the Driving & Vehicles Standards Agency has finally given the thumbs up to learners being allowed onto motorways.

In a push to make new drivers safer than ever, the DVSA has said that the new law will come into effect at some point in 2018. Learners will only be allowed on to motorways if they are with an approved driving instructor (ADI) in a car fitted with dual controls. It means if an issue should arise during the motorway lesson, the ADI will be able to step in and take over quickly.

What the Change Means for Students
The DVSA says that motorway driving is strictly voluntary and will not be included in the all-new driving test coming this December. Critically, it will be up to instructors to decide if they feel their students are ready to head out on to Britain’s busy network of motorways.

The Highway Code rules on motorways will also be updated to reflect the new change. Remember though that until the new law comes into play, it is still illegal for a learner to drive on a motorway and, if you’re a trainee motorcyclist, you still won’t be allowed on to them after the new law is introduced.

What the Change Means for Instructors
The DVSA has said that it will offer no specific training for ADIs who intend to take advantage of the motorway lesson option but the agency does say it will update learning materials and the car driving syllabus. It should be noted that trainee driving instructors will still not be allowed to take students on to a motorway.

Finally, ADIs can decide for themselves whether they want to keep their driving school roof-top box on during a motorway lesson. If the box is removed though, the instructor’s car must display L-plates both front and rear.

• For the official results of the DVSA’s consultation, click here.

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Image © Highways England

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